This is a comprehensive reference source documenting past research and development activities in agricultural value chains in Eastern Indonesia. The bibliography covers the ten commodities studied in detail under EI-ADO (maize, beef, peanut, soybean, mungbean, mangos, shallot, chilli, tomato and potato), as well as cassava, cocoa, coffee, cashews, goats, pigs and seaweed. The cross-cutting themes of integrated farming systems, contract farming and value chain markets are also covered. The bibliography focuses on references published since 2000. The references are mainly in English with some key Bahasa Indonesia references included.

Dairy goat feeding characteristics in Malang District, East Java, Indonesia.

Author: Hidayati A., Hartutik, Soebarinoto and Kusmartono Publication Date: 2012

Goats are a popular choice for rearing by farmers in upland areas because they can be cared for by women and children can consume the milk. However, there are several constraints to goat milk production, among them the limited availability of local forages for goat feed. This paper examines how locally available forages are used as feed for dairy goats by rural farmers in East Java's Malang district in order to determine the potential of goat rearing in this area. The research uses data gathered from surveys and interviews with 64 dairy goat households in six regions in the upland areas of Malang. The study found that type of dairy goats and feeds found in the upland areas is dependent on season, level of farmer education, land ownership and farming experience. It also found that the use of forages was dominantly legume tree in the wet season and tree leaf in the dry season. Furthermore, the use of crop wastes in the dry seasons is higher than in the wet seasons, which has an impact on the milk production.

Publisher: In 'Proceedings of the 1st Asia Dairy Goat Conference, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, 9-12 April 2012', ed. by R. Abdullah et al. Universiti Putra Malaysia and the Food and Agricultural Organization. Pp. 147-148

Dairy goats in Indonesia: potential, opportunities and challenges.

Author: Astuti D.A. and Sudarman A. Publication Date: 2012

The population of goats in Indonesia has increased gradually at an average rate of 4.6 per cent in the last 10 years, from 12 million in 2000 to 16.8 million in 2010, involving 3.5 million households. The goats are spread throughout 33 provinces with the highest population of goats in Central Java, East Java and West Java. This paper briefly discusses the potential for development of goat and goat milk production in Indonesia. Production of goats offers good business opportunities in Indonesia because they are very well-adapted to the tropical environment and require low investments. Farmers usually rear a few animals without intensive management, as a living bank for emergencies and expenses and as a source of fertiliser for crops. Goats are usually reared to produce meat and milk. The authors highlight that there are also a few promising businesses indicating that producing and selling goats milk is possible and profitable. There is a deficit of fresh milk supply in Indonesia that could be filled with goats milk if goat's milk is better marketed.

Publisher: In 'Proceedings of the 1st Asia Dairy Goat Conference, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, 9-12 April 2012'

Demand for technology innovation and transfer to maize farmers in South Sulawesi, Indonesia

Author: Kamaruddin A.S., Aidar G. and Baco D. Publication Date: 2010

This paper discusses the recent changes in cultivation of maize in Indonesia's South Sulawesi province. The authors present data to show the increases in area cultivated and in productivity of maize production in the region. Furthermore, they discuss how the pattern of maize varieties used in this province has changed in the last 15 years, namely from a wide use of local/white varieties (up to 40 per cent use in 1995), towards an increased use of open-pollinated superior varieties and hybrid maize varieties in the late 2000s. The paper then discusses the adoption of new technologies by farmers in the region and the reasons for such adoption, including the strong support and encouragement of the government and the use of a variety of dissemination tools including the use of media, direct communication, demonstrations and case studies. According to the authors, understanding of the local culture and politics, as well as farmer's needs in each particular region, are considered important for the success of adoption of new technologies.

Publisher: In 'Maize for Asia: emerging trends and technologies. Proceeding of the 10th Asian Regional Maize Workshop, Makassar, Indonesia, 20-23 October 2008', ed. by P.H. Zaidi, M. Azrai and K.V. Pixley. CIMMYT

Developing an effective food chain management in a developing country: a case study on Manalagi mango fruit supply chain in Indonesia

Author: Herlambang T., Batt P.J. and McGregor M.J. Publication Date: 2006

In this paper, the authors explore the effectiveness of the Manalagi mango supply chain in Indonesia using gap, price margin and relationship analyses. Price margin analysis revealed significant transportation costs and fruit sometimes reaching the wholesale market in inferior condition due to delays since harvesting because of transportation problems. The authors thus highlight that improvements in transportation infrastructure are important to reduce produce losses and increase value in the chains. Gap analysis showed several quality dimensions which could be explored to add more value in the supply chain in the form of quality, timeliness, food safety and labour standards in production and marketing. At the same time, relationship analysis highlighted the need for more effective communication between and within all chain participants. The authors note that barriers to achieving greater coordination include lack of mutual trust by chain participants and lack of an acceptable governance system with fair sharing of risk and rewards in the value chain. Achieving effective alignment among all participants in the value chain is an important factor in developing an effective supply chain.

Publisher: 16th Annual IAMA Food and Agribusiness Forum, Symposium and Case Conference, 12-15 October 2006, Buenos Aires, Argentina

Development of improved maize varieties in Indonesia. In 'Maize for Asia: emerging trends and technologies

Author: Mejaya M.J., Takdir A., Iriany N. and Yasin H.G.M. Publication Date: 2010

Maize productivity in Indonesia is relatively low (3.66 t/ha), yet in some provinces it rises above 4.0 t/ha. This higher productivity is due to farmers' adoption of production technology, including the use of improved maize varieties. This paper describes the progress of the Indonesian Agency for Agricultural Research and Development's breeding program to develop several improved maize varieties in Indonesia. The research compares the characteristics and yield potential of nine open pollinated maize varieties (OPVs) and 13 hybrid maize varieties that have been released by the government since 1992. Findings show that B11-209 and Nei 9008—female parents of hybrids Bima-2 and Bima-3—gave better combining ability with Mr14 than Mr4 and could replace Mr4 as testers in the hybrid breeding program. The Modified Reciprocal Recurrent Selection breeding method effectively improved grain yield of the MSJ2 population. The authors conclude that OPVs are still needed, especially in areas outside Java with high soil acidity, low soil fertility and drought stress. Furthermore, development of quality protein maize varieties is needed to improve the low nutrition value of children in some parts of Indonesia, especially in drought prone areas.

Publisher: Proceeding of the 10th Asian Regional Maize Workshop, Makassar, Indonesia, 20-23 October 2008', ed. by P.H. Zaidi, M. Azrai and K.V. Pixley. CIMMYT

Development of quality protein maize (QPM) in Indonesia

Author: Yasin H.G., Mejaya M.J., Kasim F. and Subandi. Publication Date: 2005

This paper presents the findings of a study on two quality protein maize (QPM) varieties— Srikandi putih-1 (white kernels - for food) and Srikandi kuning-1 (yellow kernels - for animal feed). The research was based on two sets of experiments that were compared with the normal check varieties—22 populations of yellow QPM and 10 populations of white QPM. Each set used a randomized complete block design with three replications in 11 locations of central maize areas in Indonesia during 2002 and 2003. The stability model showed that genotype and environment interaction was significant for grain yield. The potential grain yield for Srikandi putih-1 was 7.91 t/ha or 13.4 per cent higher than the normal maize. Grain yield of Srikandi kuning-1 was 7.92 t/ha or 2 per cent higher than normal maize check variety Bisma. The white and yellow QPM varieties possessed lysine concentration of 0.36 per cent and 0.45 per cent and tryptophan concentration of 0.07 per cent and 0.085 per cent, respectively. Both maize varieties were subsequently released in 2004 as the first national QPM varieties.

Publisher: In 'Proceedings of the Ninth Asian Regional Maize Workshop, 5-9 September 2005, Beijing, China

Distribution of gains from cattle development in a multi-stage production system: the case of the Bali beef industry

Author: Ambarawati I.G.A.A., Zhao X., Griffith G. and Piggott R. Publication Date: 2004

A number of different policies have been implemented to enhance development of different parts of the Bali beef industry. However, information on the benefits is limited and therefore evaluation of the various policies is required to guide future policy development. This paper explores the benefits from cattle development in a multi-stage production representation of the Bali beef industry using equilibrium displacement modelling. The impact on various industry groups such as smallholders, processors, retailers and consumers, is estimated in terms of their welfare changes. The results demonstrate that for a one per cent exogenous shift in the relevant market (from productivity advances or quality improvements), improved productivity of Bali cattle production has the largest total benefits (Rp 3.02 billion, about A$ 0.6 million), over a time period of two to three years. Bali cattle producers receive substantial benefits (35 to 71 per cent of total returns) from any cost reduction or improved efficiency scenario. The authors conclude that this model seems appropriate for examining other types of research and development and policy scenarios, however further research would be needed in several areas.

Journal: Working Paper Series in Agricultural and Resource Economics
Publisher: University of New England Graduate School of Agricultural and Resource Economics & School of Economics, Australia. ISSN 1442 1909

Diversity of Indonesian mango (Mangifera indica) cultivars based on morphological and RAPD markers

Author: Fitmawati, Hartana A. and Purwoko B.S. . Publication Date: 2010

This paper outlines the classification of 82 Indonesian mango cultivars based on morphological characters, RAPD markers (DNA) and a combination of both. Mango cultivars for classification were sourced from Cukur Gondang Collection Garden, East Java. Results, including coefficients of similarity, are presented and discussed for each method of classification: morphological, RAPD markers or the combination of both. The morphological assessment involved 92 morphological characteristics. Results of a cluster analysis provides some detail on the discerning characteristics for each cluster. The results also include a comparison of the clusters and grouping identified through each classification method. The author concludes that the molecular method of RAPD markers and morphological characteristics do not quantify or organise cultivars based on genetic diversity, equally, as the grouping based on RAPD markers produced clusters different to those identified by morphology. The report also concluded that there is wide diversity in Indonesian mango cultivars: 15-62% (morphology), 2-31% (RAPD), and 12-40% (combination of both markers).

Journal: SABRAO Journal of Breeding and Genetics 42(2), 83-94

Diversity of Indonesian mango (Mangifera indica) cultivars based on morphological and RAPD markers

Author: Fitmawati, Hartana A. and Purwoko B.S. Publication Date: 2010

This paper outlines the classification of 82 Indonesian mango cultivars based on morphological characters, RAPD markers (DNA) and a combination of both. Mango cultivars for classification were sourced from Cukur Gondang Collection Garden, East Java. Results, including coefficients of similarity, are presented and discussed for each method of classification: morphological, RAPD markers or the combination of both. The morphological assessment involved 92 morphological characteristics. Results of a cluster analysis provides some detail on the discerning characteristics for each cluster. The results also include a comparison of the clusters and grouping identified through each classification method. The author concludes that the molecular method of RAPD markers and morphological characteristics do not quantify or organise cultivars based on genetic diversity, equally, as the grouping based on RAPD markers produced clusters different to those identified by morphology. The report also concluded that there is wide diversity in Indonesian mango cultivars: 15-62% (morphology), 2-31% (RAPD), and 12-40% (combination of both markers).

Journal: SABRAO Journal of Breeding and Genetics 42(2), 83-94

Do chili traders make price volatility worse? A qualitative analysis of East Java trading practices

Author: Webb A.J., Kartikarsari F.G. and Kosasih I.A. Publication Date: 2012

In this paper, Webb et al. examine the trading practices of market intermediaries in the Indonesian chili market and how they affect the transmission of chili market information through their effect on prices. The research involves a series of structured interviews with chili traders and wholesalers to investigate five potential impediments to an efficient market: market structure impediments to competition; lack of scale economies; market intermediary value-added functions; post-harvest losses; and price risk premiums. This was followed by an analysis of vertical price transmission using monthly data for farm, wholesale and retail prices in the Kediri district of East Java. Results show a competitive market environment, only small post-harvest losses, and no stockholding at any level of the marketing chain. They also reveal that price margins in East Java are positively and statistically related to farm price levels. The authors propose two policy options to address the price volatility—imports of fresh chillies from other countries or government subsidized investment in cold storage facilities to reduce the amplitude of price fluctuations and give farmers more time to respond to tight market conditions.

Publisher: National Cheng Kung University: Taiwan

Pages